Rooftop of the World

 

There is nothing beautiful than feeling like top of the world. A incredible scene on the way to the foot of Himalayas.

Photo on the way to Badrinath, Uttarakand, India

The Himalayas are one of the youngest but the highest (29029 feet) mountain ranges on the planet and are the third largest deposit of ice and snow in the world, after Antarctica and the Arctic.

The Himalayas developed in the collision of two tectonic plates called the Eurasian and Indo-Australian plates. The interaction of the two plates about 20 million years ago pushed India and Tibet together, forming the Himalayas when they collided.

The mountain range varies in width from 62 to 248 miles wide. The Himalayas stretch across the northeastern portion of India. They cover approximately 1,500 mi (2,400 km) and pass through the nations of India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, China, Bhutan and Nepal. The Himalayas are home to famous mountain peaks that are the first, second and third highest peaks on the planet and climbing destinations. These peaks include Mt. Everest (the highest), Karakoram (K2) and Kanchenjunga, respectively.

In 1953, Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa mountaineer Tenzing Norgay were the first people to successfully climb to the summit of Everest.

Posted for Wordless Wednesdays

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9 thoughts on “Rooftop of the World

  1. To see this one-of-a-kind view in person must be the most amazing thing – thank you for capturing it so beautifully for the rest of us! I would love to trek the Himalayan foothills someday (but I’ll leave summiting the peaks to others, I’m far too big a sissy for that!) 🙂

    In a bit of personal trivia, I went to the University of New Hampshire with Tenzing Norgay’s son, Norbu Tenzing and got to know him when we both lived in the International Dorm during my senior year. I reconnected with him via phone and email a few years ago when when I raised money for the American Himalayan Foundation, of which he’s vice president, in a 24 hour blogathon with a blog I called Shambala. 🙂

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